WSKY 2

Sample 2 of the WSKY project exploration.

WSKY

Playing around with some pattern techniques for WSKY (Whiskey), a line that will possibly be introduced into a future run of FRNT brand products.

Adrian Frutiger Spread

Final spread layout preview.

All about grids and pictograms: Final

The icons are done! It’s been a lot of technical work to get everything working the way it should, but I am fairly pleased with the outcome. I have learnt a lot about the processes of icon creation, and even file organisation.

Here are the final icons:
image

Educational aspects
In terms of progress, it was a very interesting task. The most valuable technical element that I learnt from this process was the processes required to turn a complex line/path drawing into a single colour compound shape. Also, overall, the requirements to simplify - the Synecdoche; for example, at certain sizes I left the external oblique muscles (boxer’s muscles) in the icon, but removed them when the body was zoomed out too much (see Core vs. Chest). To understand this a bit more, check out my last blog post quoting Jonathon Ive about simplicty in design.

Problems!
In a way the requirement to simplify could be seen as an issue which I had to overcome. Technically, however, the most prevalent issue was to do with the preparation of the compound paths; in some stages, and depending on how the lines and paths were created for certain icons, creating a merged icon and turning it into a single coloured object (compound shape) caused extra layers to be created, filling in the negative space. This was rectified by cleaning up path anchors, deleting those additional created layers, or simplifying the grouping/layer organisation.

Usually concepts change throughout the design process to cater for problems or a renewed requirement. For this project, the concept has remained to be identical to the original. To view the original concept, check out the first post on this project.

Usage
Ultimately, the icons are made to be a hybrid between infographics which are used on existing gym equipment, and wayfinding icons. The idea of simplifying and merging these two into one, gives the observer a more immediate visual to help him/her understand what the equipment or gym area will target in terms of bodybuilding. To achieve this, the icons will be placed on the equipment itself, and on walls of the dedicated rooms for certain exercises (Leg exercise room, Olympic exercise room and so on).

imageInfographics utilised on outdoor gym equipmentimageWayfinding icons used at airports

To conclude, I just want to say; get your technical aspects in order before your start! Organise your files, set them up properly, make yourself checklists, and ALWAYS make sure your project is being made in a mode that suits its final use (e.g. print vs. web). Doing these things early on will save you a lot of time at the end!

Now into something else!

Quote

"To be truly sim­ple, you have to go really deep. For exam­ple, to have no screws on some­thing, you can end up hav­ing a prod­uct that is so con­vo­luted and so com­plex. The bet­ter way is to go deeper with the sim­plic­ity, to under­stand every­thing about it and how it’s man­u­fac­tured. You have to deeply under­stand the essence of a prod­uct in order to be able to get rid of the parts that are not essential. To be truly sim­ple, you have to go really deep. For exam­ple, to have no screws on some­thing, you can end up hav­ing a prod­uct that is so con­vo­luted and so com­plex. The bet­ter way is to go deeper with the sim­plic­ity, to under­stand every­thing about it and how it’s man­u­fac­tured. You have to deeply under­stand the essence of a prod­uct in order to be able to get rid of the parts that are not essential."

- Jonathan Ive

Design has rules, and yes, rules are sometimes meant to be broken, but you have to have a fundamental understanding of those rules to be able to break them. Knowing exactly what you’re doing and not doing is key to good design.